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Sunday, June 16, 2013

Book Review: Tamed by Douglas R. Brown

Title: Tamed
Author: Douglas R Brown
Publisher: Rhemalda Publishing
Published: January 2012
Editions: print and ebook
Length: 312 pages
Source: Netgalley for an honest review

Synposis:
Werewolves are real. And they make excellent pets.

Owning one of the legendary creatures is the latest fad. The WereHouse insists their werepets are loyal, docile, and 100% safe, but what happens when these gentle giants turn on their masters?

While on a routine EMS call, paramedic Christine Alt is attacked by a rogue werepet. She escapes with her life, but the encounter leaves her with more than just scars. As her body begins to change, she discovers the WereHouse is hiding a terrible secret, and they will stop at nothing to keep her from exposing them.

Tamed is a werewolf tale with a twist from the author of the The Light of Epertase trilogy




A_TiffyFit's Review
Wow! Just when you thought that all has been covered about the stories of werewolves comes Douglas R. Brown's werewolves. This is certainly a new take on an old genre. And, I know I say this often (it's because I know how to pick 'em when I request books, seriously), but Brown's rendition is believable as in "holy crap this could happen!" Who knows? It could be you, it could be one of my relatives, or hey...it could be ME -- so watch out! Anything's possible!

I'm a firm believer that it is humans who are the pests and piranhas and parasites of the world, infecting and destroying the Earth and its animals. And that if there IS such thing as evil, it lies within human beings. The rest of the beings on earth have reason, but it's about survival. It is us humans who do the harm to all things on earth, and arrogantly believe we have the rights over all other things because we are at the top of the food chain since we can make weapons.

So. Brown's "Tamed" gave me great satisfaction when the revenge rains upon those humans who are this way: Those who disregard and disrespect all creatures and things because we are "the top" instead of being more caring, accepting, and brotherly like. The caretakers of all that's graced upon us, which includes all species big and small on this planet we share, this planet we all call home.

The "Tamed"'s different take is refreshing and full of energy and constant motion/action. It is a page turner that causes you to anticipate what will occur next. The end is both an expected event and a surprise, but a good one. One will come away from this book feeling good and satisfied.

A concise and well-told tale which doesn't get lost in too many unnecessary tangents. Brown's straight-forward story entrenches the reader in an exciting read that doesn't need or have superfluous fanfare!